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Doctors prescribing Chicken Curry in place of antibiotics after CSE findings

08, Aug 2014 By sambitdash

New Delhi. With Center for Science and Environment (CSE) finding residual antibiotics in as much as 40% chicken tested in the NCR region, a new wave of antibiotics are beginning to be prescribed by leading doctors in the country – the chicken itself.

That there are a cocktail of antibiotics like tetracycline, fluoroquinolones, aminoglycosides, etc., many physicians, especially the new ones or the ones who had someone else write their entrance exam, are extremely satisfied. The reason for their satisfaction is that even if they miss the diagnosis, the cocktail of antibiotics, in this case the ‘tikka‘ or the ‘seekh‘, will do the trick.

fried_chicken
Yummy antibiotic.

“When there are about six to eight antibiotics in chicken, one is bound to work!” said a visibly happy and relaxed physician running his own clinic, who did not wish to be named.

However, doctors fear that there is one reason chicken therapy may not work. The antibiotics that the hapless chickens were given, were procured from, no guesses for that, China.

When questioned, poultry owners confessed sourcing from China. “Given the skyrocketing price of the drug companies be it Ranbaxy or Glaxo, which millions of poor patients can’t afford, how on earth can we?” a chicken farmer told Faking News.

But many other doctors allay such fears, claiming Indians are already surviving on Chinese goods, so Chinese medicines should work too.

“When we can’t fight the mighty Chinese or the ‘poultry mafia’, let’s rather use it to our advantage,” argued Dr Narayan Fefdalaya.

Under this chicken therapy, if one is visiting the OPD regarding complains of flu, one could as well be asked to eat a plate of chicken kebab.

Following such prescriptions from doctors, the business of restaurants is flourishing. Many restaurants have changed their menu; along with the price column, an antibiotic column has also come up.

While this augurs well for the non-vegetarians, the vegetarians are worried that they would have to resort to the costly pill route. They have now demanded antibiotics to be incorporated in as many vegetables possible.

Amidst all this, doctors see this as a future possibility where the true sense of healthy balanced diet will be achieved, where drugs can be administered via the normal day-to-day food route.