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Traces of sense of humor found in Indian IT professionals

24, Feb 2013 By Achu Pichu

Bangalore. Scientists have almost reached a breakthrough in proving that there are clinical traces of sense of humor present in Indian IT professionals. Though this has not been confirmed yet, the very possibility of this being true has been welcomed by the rest of the Indian citizens.

In a controlled experiment conducted in the Department of Bio-sciences in the Indian Institute of Science, scientists collected sample smiles from a few volunteers from the local IT industry.

IT Park
Even builders constructing IT parks and hubs don’t show any IT professional laughing in their ads, many point out.

Dr. Balakrishnan, the head scientist, told Faking News, “We isolated these volunteers from computers for a period of time, and we could see a growth of humor culture in them under the microscope.”

Apparently, after sufficient relaxation, one of the volunteers made a joke that went like “I am in delivery, my wife is also in delivery; I deliver projects, she delivers babies… hahahaha!”

Scientists confirmed that the above joke evoked some smiles from the other volunteers that lasted approximately 5 microseconds, while the women’s groups claimed that it was a sexist remark.

Such experiments were repeated and crucial data was collected. The volunteers offered to do the data-entry work, but scientists refused as it could have had adverse impact on the experiments.

“Initial results prove that sustained de-exposure to IT work and culture induce the volunteers to attempt, create, and receive some humor, however microscopic in quantities it is,” Dr. Balakrishnan confirmed.

One of the volunteers, however, was very apprehensive of the experiment and claimed that any growth of humor could be a serious impediment to the career growth in IT.

“We spent years to get rid of our smiles and then we started progressing well. Our increments were directly proportional to how humorless we are. These kinds of experiments may destroy that!” he feared.

“They don’t need to worry. Once they return to work, they will be normal again,” the head scientist allayed such fears.